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Election 2000 logo Voters Guide
California Primary - March 7

 

PRESIDENT
U.S. SENATE

U.S. HOUSE
CALIFORNIA SENATE
CALIFORNIA ASSEMBLY
STATEWIDE PROPOSITIONS

LOCAL RACES
Santa Clara County
Board of Supervisors
Superior Court
Los Altos Hills Council
San Jose Council
Water District
Open Space Authority
Ballot measures

Alameda County
Board of Supervisors
Board of Education
Ballot measures

San Mateo County
Board of Supervisors
Half Moon Bay Council
Ballot measures

Santa Cruz County
Board of Supervisors
District Attorney
Superior Court
Ballot measures

San Benito County
Board of Supervisors
Superior Court
Board of Education

GRAPHICS
How to use Pollstar ballot machine

Are we there yet? An explanation of the primary process

NEWS
Politics & Government on Mercury Center

Campaign 2000 at RealCities

RESOURCES ONLINE
California Secretary of State voter information
California Voter Foundation's nonpartisan guide
League of Women Voters' nonpartisan guide
Rough and Tumble, a daily snapshot on California politics

Alameda County
Monterey County
San Benito County
Santa Clara County
Santa Cruz County

CREDITS

 

PRIMARY OVERVIEW

  Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Come back to Mercury Center for complete coverage of primary results.

Open primary mixes parties
In an open primary, a voter can vote for any candidate regardless of the voter's party and the candidate's party. Democrats can vote for Democrats, Republicans or third-party candidates. Republicans can vote for Republicans, Democrats or third-party candidates. Find out who can vote and which votes count toward nominations in an open primary.

Smaller parties offer more choices
Prime yourself on the state's smaller political parties including: Libertarian, American Independant, Green Party, Peace and Freedom Party, Natural Law and the Reform party.

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PRESIDENTIAL RACE

Presidential primary is a mother lode
California has waited a long time for presidential primaries to really matter. For years candidates have come to California after the nominees were a foregone conclusion. This year the primary is set to make a maximum impact on the races.

The candiates on the issues

US SENATE RACE

A quiet GOP Senate campaign
The race to determine Democratic incumbent Diane Feinstein's opponent has been the quietest major statewide campaign in years. Leading GOP candidates find it difficult to raise the kind of money needed to buy the television and radio time crucial to getting their names known.

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US HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

U.S. House race
This year incumbents are being challenged by a myriad of new contenders. Education is a big issue on the candidates' minds. Incumbent Sam Farr in District 17 faces a crowded field of three possible contenders. In Distict 10, 12 and 14, three Republicans in each district vie to battle the incumbent democrats.

Clickable map

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Districts: 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17

STATE SENATE

Districts: 11, 13, 15

 

California Senate race
Democrat John Vasconcellos is running for his second term in District 13. In District 11 all candidates are all running unopposed.Two untested Democrats vie for chance to unseat incumbent Bruce McPherson in District 15.

Clickable map

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STATE ASSEMBLY

Districts: 23, 24, 28
Districts 18, 20, 21, 22 and 27 (uncontested)

 

California Assembly race
In the 23rd Assembly District, six candidates vie for San Jose democrat Mike Honda's office. Assembly Districts 18, 20, 21, 22 and 27 candidates are running unopposed. Six compete to replace Republican Jim Cunneen in District 24 and another six compete for Republican Peter Frusetta's seat in District 28.

Clickable map

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PROPOSITIONS

Voters facing 20 propositions on the ballot
Remember all those topics you're not supposed to talk about at the dinner table. Don't worry they're all on the ballot in the array of propositions. The hot topic is same-sex marriages in Prop 22. The presidential primary ballot includes measures on smoking and gambling and almost $4.7 billion in bonds for parks, water, literacy programs, crime labs and veterans' homes.

Proposition 1A
Proposition 12
Proposition 13
Proposition 14
Proposition 15

Proposition 16
Proposition 17
Proposition 18
Proposition 19
Proposition 20

Proposition 21
Proposition 22
Proposition 23
Proposition 24
Proposition 25

Proposition 26
Proposition 27
Proposition 28
Proposition 29
Proposition 30
Proposition 31

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Published February 20, 2000

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The original version of this Voters Guide, published on the Mercury Center site, is no longer available. Some links will no longer function. Rotating banner ads appeared in this space.

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