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Election 2000 logo (sm) Voters Guide Calif. Primary - Mar. 7

 

NATIONAL AND STATEWIDE
Open primary mixes parties
Smaller parties offer more choices
Presidential primary is a mother lode
The presidential candidates on the issues
Other candidates in the presidenital race
A quiet GOP Senate campaign
Other candidates for the Senate seat

U.S. HOUSE
District 10
District 12
District 13
District 14
District 15
District 16
District 17

CALIFORNIA STATE SENATE
District 11
District 13
District 15

CALIFORNIA STATE ASSEMBLY
District 23
District 24
District 28
Districts 18, 20, 21, 22, and 27
(uncontested)

PROPOSITIONS
Voters facing 20 ballot measures
Pro, con, for and against

LOCAL RACES
Santa Clara County
Board of Supervisors
Superior Court
Los Altos Hills Council
San Jose Council
Water District
Open Space Authority
Ballot measures

Alameda County
Board of Supervisors
Board of Education
Ballot measures

San Mateo County
Board of Supervisors
Half Moon Bay Council
Ballot measures

Santa Cruz County
Board of Supervisors
District Attorney
Superior Court
Ballot measures

San Benito County
Board of Supervisors
Superior Court
Board of Education

GRAPHICS
How to use Pollstar ballot machine

Are we there yet? An explanation of the primary process

NEWS
Politics & Government on Mercury Center

Campaign 2000 at RealCities

RESOURCES ONLINE
California Secretary of State voter information
California Voter Foundation's nonpartisan guide
League of Women Voters' nonpartisan guide
Rough and Tumble, a daily snapshot on California politics

Alameda County
Monterey County
San Benito County
Santa Clara County
Santa Cruz County

CREDITS

 
     

THE PRESIDENCY

The candidates on the issues

Issue: Education

Bill Bradley
Backs national education standards, better pay and training for teachers, including forgiving student loans and providing scholarships. Supports expanding the Head Start preschool program and spending $2 billion over five years for improved technology at community colleges. Has voted for school voucher pilot programs, but now is skeptical.


Al Gore
Supports smaller class sizes, more charter schools and mandatory testing of new teachers. Would offer $10,000 toward college expenses to recruit new teachers. Proposed a tax-free savings account to save for college tuition. Calls for universal pre-school. Opposes school vouchers.

George W. Bush
Would create financial incentives to increase student performance based on state-based testing. Has proposed $3 billion in loan guarantees to build 2,000 charter schools. Supports parental contributions of up to $5,000 a year to tax-free savings accounts to pay for any educational expense, including private schools. Would allow parents with children in the worst-performing schools to use $1,500 a year for any education alternative, including private education.

Alan Keyes
Would abolish the federal education department and let parents choose how to spend their share of the federal money, including private school tuitions.

John McCain
Supports giving federal education money to the states in the form of block grants. Supports higher teacher pay. Backs tax-free education savings accounts. Would provide tax credits up to $200 a year for people who donate to pubic or private schools. Has proposed school vouchers worth $2,000 a year for disadvantaged children.

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Issue: Health Care

Bill Bradley
Proposes near-universal health care by subsidizing premiums for low-to-middle income families and making all health care premiums deductible. Would end Medicaid and allow those families to buy into plans offered to federal employees. Would offer Medicare recipients an optional prescription drug benefit. Supports a patient's right to sue an HMO after an appeals process.


Al Gore
Would expand insurance coverage to children in families earning up to 250 percent of the poverty level, up from 200 percent, with a goal of insuring all children by 2005. Would allow more people above the poverty level to purchase federally supported state coverage. Would provide a 25 percent tax credit for premiums paid by small businesses and the self-employed. Would create new Medicare prescription drug benefit. Supports a patient's right to sue an HMO after an appeals process.

George W. Bush
Proposes expanding tax-free medical savings accounts and providing Medicare recipients with a greater choice of private alternatives, including a prescription drug benefit. Would offer tax incentives to encourage small businesses to provide employee coverage. Would allow patients to appeal denials of care to an independent panel and in some cases to sue the HMO.

Alan Keyes
Would expand tax-free medical savings accounts. Believes that it is not the business of government to guarantee health insurance coverage, but would keep Medicare.

John McCain
Would offer a new prescription drug program for the elderly, up to $2 billion a year in subsidies for those below 200 percent of poverty level. Supports expanding medical savings accounts, full deductions for the self-employed and a $2 billion increase for veterans health care. Would require independent review before a patient could sue an HMO and restrict punitive damages.

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Issue: Taxes

Bill Bradley
Wants to expand the earned income tax credit. Would allow families who don't earn enough for dependent care tax credit to receive an average of $470 in cash. Supports lower tax rates by ending $25 billion in corporate tax breaks over 10 years. Backs $1 increase in minimum wage over two years and then indexing increases to the rise in the median wage.


Al Gore
Calls for targeted tax breaks to encourage education and retirement savings. Would increase the earning cap to qualify for the earned income tax credit. Would increase credit $500 for married couples earning $29,000 a year. Backs $1 increase in minimum wage over two years.

George W. Bush
Proposes a $483 billion, five-year tax cut plan that reduces the top rate from 39.6 percent to 33 percent and the lowest rate from 15 percent to 10 percent. Proposes doubling the child tax credit, expanding charitable deductions and eliminating estate taxes. Would finance tax cuts with non-Social Security surplus and economic growth. Pledges to veto any increase in personal or corporate income taxes. Backs $1 increase in minimum wage but would let states opt out.

Alan Keyes
Advocates replacing the federal income tax with a national sales tax. Does not support an increase in the minimum wage.

John McCain
Proposes a $237 billion, five-year tax cut plan that would expand the bottom 15 percent tax bracket to couples with taxable incomes of $70,000 up from $43,000. Would allow all-purpose tax-deferred savings accounts and double the child tax credit. Would finance tax cuts from the budget surplus and by ending $150 billion in corporate tax breaks. Would put most of the budget surplus toward Social Security, Medicare and debt reduction. Does not support an increase in the minimum wage.

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Issue: High tech

Bill Bradley
Supports making the research and development tax credit permanent and the Clinton administration's decision to ease high-tech export controls. Backs the current moratorium on taxing Internet transactions and would encourage a tax policy that doesn't erode local and state revenues or restrict electronic commerce.


Al Gore
Backs a permanent research and development tax credit and the recent Clinton administration moves to loosen H-1B visa caps as well as encryption and supercomputer export controls. Supports Internet taxation moratorium while searching for a solution to encourage electronic commerce and keep municipalities financially whole.

George W. Bush
Supports making the research and development tax credit permanent and increasing the H-1B visa cap. Would set up an advisory committee to review high-tech export controls. Calls for a three-year extension of the Internet tax moratorium, due to expire in 2001.

Alan Keyes
No proposals.

John McCain
Supports making the research and development tax credit permanent, eliminating the current cap on H-1B visas and the Clinton administration's decision to ease high-tech export controls. Calls for a permanent ban on taxation of Internet commerce.

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Issue: Environment

Bill Bradley
Proposes full funding of the leading federal program for parks acquisition, more vigorous prosecution of polluters and a ban on all oil drilling off the California coast, including ending the existing leases off the central coast. Proposes $250 million a year for ocean and coastal protection. Calls for better enforcement of the Central Valley Project Improvement Act, which he co-authored. Would end government subsidies to private ranchers and miners on public lands in the West.


Al Gore
Backs research into renewable energy sources, spending $2 billion over 10 years for new park lands, and spending $1 billion to help communities manage growth. Calls for more investment in mass transit. Led the U.S effort to ratify the worldwide treaty to reduce greenhouse emissions. Backs a permanent moratorium on new oil drilling leases off the California coast, but the Clinton administration has not banned drilling on 36 existing leases off the central coast.

George W. Bush
Believes environmental laws should be based on best science and market-driven technologies. Generally opposes federal environmental mandates. Calls for full funding of the leading federal program for parks acquisition and for addressing the backlog of repairs and improvements to national parks and wildlife refuges. Opposes the worldwide treaty to reduce greenhouse emissions. Supports a moratorium on new oil drilling off the California coast and would work with state officials to determine future of existing leases off the central coast.  KEYES: Has no specific proposals.

Alan Keyes
Has no specific proposals.

John McCain
Supports development of more efficient energy sources. Wrote a law creating an organization to resolve environmental conflicts. Calls for more efficient federal programs to clean up toxic sites and enforce clean air and water regulations. Backs federal government efforts to preserve open lands and historic places. Supports a moratorium on new oil drilling off the California coast and would work with state officials to determine future of existing leases off the central coast.

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Issue: Trade/foreign policy

Bill Bradley
Believes international organizations should play a larger role in ending ethnic conflicts. Supported American involvement in Kosovo but criticized the Clinton administration for lack of an exit strategy. Backs trade liberalization with China, including entry into the World Trade Organization. Emphasizes reducing nuclear warheads in Russia.


Al Gore
Says the United States should be willing to step in when strategic interests and human rights atrocities require it.Supports trade liberalization with China, including entry into the World Trade Organization. Believes U.S. should back economic reforms in Russia and work for reduction of nuclear warheads.

George W. Bush
Believes the United States needs to re-examine its intervention policies, with the goal of reducing international troop deployments.Would refocus Asia policy on allies and redefine China as a "competitor." Supports China's entry into the World Trade Organization. Would end International Monetary Fund loans to Russia and redirect U.S. assistance away from corrupt officials.

Alan Keyes
Would end United States involvement in the World Trade Organization and trade relations with China.

John McCain
Says United States has responsibility to keep peace in strategic regions as well as respond to ethnic crises where human atrocities are committed. Supports active arming of forces that are trying to overthrow "rogue'' regimes in Iraq, North Korea and elsewhere. Backs China's entry into the World Trade Organization. Threatens to cut U.S. aid and International Monetary Fund loans to Russia unless its intervention in Chechnya ends.

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Issue: Gun control

Bill Bradley
Calls for federal registration of all new and existing handguns and licensing of their owners after a safety course. Supports mandatory sale of trigger locks for new guns, a 72-hour waiting period after a gun-show purchase and a ban on "Saturday Night Specials.'' Proposes limiting handgun purchases to one a month. Backs a municipality's right to sue gun manufacturers.


Al Gore
Proposes requiring states to license new gun owners with a photo ID after passing a safety test. Would require gun manufacturers and dealers to report gun sales to a state authority. Backs raising the minimum age for handgun ownership from 18 to 21, a 72-hour waiting period after a gun-show purchase and a ban on "Saturday Night Specials.'' Supports mandatory sale of trigger locks with new guns and a municipality's right to sue gun manufacturers.

George W. Bush
Supports raising the minimum age for handgun purchase from 18 to 21. Backs instant background checks for gun-show sales, a ban on juveniles possessing semi-automatic weapons and a lifetime restriction on gun ownership for serious juvenile offenders. Supports banning import of "high-capacity'' ammunition clips. Supports stronger enforcement of current gun laws.

Alan Keyes
Opposes gun control.

John McCain
Supports instant background checks for all gun sales and mandatory sale of trigger locks with gun purchases. Supports stronger enforcement of current gun laws.

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Issue: Abortion

Bill Bradley
Supports abortion rights, including federal funding for abortion for low-income women.


Al Gore
Supports abortion rights. Voted as congressman against federal funding of abortion for low-income women, but now supports it.

George W. Bush
Opposes abortion, except in cases of rape, incest or when the life of the mother is threatened. Would not require Supreme Court nominees to be pro-life.

Alan Keyes
Opposes abortion. Would require Supreme Court nominees to be pro-life.

John McCain
Opposes abortion, except in cases of rape, incest or when the life of the mother is threatened. Would not require Supreme Court nominees to be pro-life.

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Issue: Gay rights

Bill Bradley
Believes gays should serve openly in the military. Does not support gay marriage but opposes the initiative on California's March ballot to ban recognition of gay marriage because it is "divisive."


Al Gore
Believes gays should serve openly in the military. Opposes gay marriage and is against the initiative on California's March ballot to ban recognition of gay marriage because it is "divisive."

George W. Bush
Supports the current "don't ask, don't tell" policy in the military, opposes gay marriage and takes no position on the initiative on California's March ballot to ban recognition of gay marriage.

Alan Keyes
Does not believe gays should serve in the military. Opposes gay marriage.

John McCain
Supports the current "don't ask, don't tell" policy in the military. Opposes gay marriage. Has taken no position on the initiative on California's March ballot to ban recognition of gay marriage.

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Issue: Campaign finance

Bill Bradley
Would ban all unregulated donations to political parties, increase public financing of elections and require television broadcasters to give candidates free air time. Refuses political action committee contributions.


Al Gore
Would ban all unregulated donations to political parties, increase public financing of elections and require television broadcasters to give candidates free air time. Refuses political action committee contributions.

George W. Bush
Would ban unregulated donations from corporations and labor unions to political parties, raise limits on contributions to candidates and require instant Internet disclosure of contributions. Accepts political action committee contributions.

Alan Keyes
Would remove all limits on contributions to candidates and political parties, bolster disclosure requirements and end public financing of presidential elections. Accepts political action committee contributions.

John McCain
Would ban all unregulated donations to political parties, raise limits on contributions to candidates and end public financing of presidential elections. Accepts political action committee contributions.

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Issue: Social Security

Bill Bradley
Supports electronic processing to save billions of dollars. Is skeptical of allowing workers to invest a portion of the Social Security payroll tax in private investments.


Al Gore
Opposes allowing workers to invest Social Security payroll tax in the stock market or other private investments.

George W. Bush
Supports workers ability to invest portion of Social Security payroll tax through personal retirement accounts.

Alan Keyes
Supports individual retirement accounts in place of Social Security.

John McCain
Backs allowing workers to choose to invest a portion of their Social Security payroll tax in private investments.

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Issue: Defense

Bill Bradley
Opposes increases in defense spending but wants to use savings by eliminating outdated weapons. Believes arms control and diplomatic pressure are a more effective way to reduce the possiblity of nuclear attack than a national missile defense system. Backs the comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty, which was defeated in the Senate.


Al Gore
Supports increases in defense spending. Says he would be willing to consider changing the anti-ballistic missile treaty to allow for a national missile defense system if U.S. faced a serious threat from a rogue nation.

George W. Bush
Supports $1 billion pay raise for military. Proposes spending $20 billion over five years for research and development. Would work quickly to amend anti-ballistic missile treaty to allow U.S. to deploy a national and theater-based missile defense system. Opposed the comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty, which was defeated in the Senate.

Alan Keyes
Supports increases in defense spending and a national missile defense system. Opposed the comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty. Favors cutting funds to nuclear disarmament programs.

John McCain
Supports closing military bases to save $4 billion, and spending $4.3 billion over three years for higher pay for military. Would make amending anti-ballistic missile treaty to allow deployment of a national and overseas missile defense system one of his highest priorities. Voted against comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty in the Senate.

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Issue: Other social issues

Bill Bradley
Favors affirmative action, opposes voluntary prayer in public schools and supports federal funding of the National Endowment for the Arts.


Al Gore
Favors affirmative action, opposes voluntary prayer in public schools and supports federal funding of the National Endowment for the Arts.

George W. Bush
Opposes racial preferences, supports voluntary prayer in public schools and would give states more say in spending of federal arts money.

Alan Keyes
Opposes racial preferences, supports voluntary prayer in public schools and does not support federal funding of the arts.

John McCain
Favors affirmative action in limited cases, supports voluntary prayer in public schools and opposes federal funding for the National Endowment for the Arts.

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Mercury News Political Writer Mary Anne Ostrom

   
       

Published February 20, 2000

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