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Election 2000 logo (sm) Voters Guide Calif. Primary - Mar. 7

 

NATIONAL AND STATEWIDE
Open primary mixes parties
Smaller parties offer more choices
Presidential primary is a mother lode
The presidential candidates on the issues
Other candidates in the presidenital race
A quiet GOP Senate campaign
Other candidates for the Senate seat

U.S. HOUSE
District 10
District 12
District 13
District 14
District 15
District 16
District 17

CALIFORNIA STATE SENATE
District 11
District 13
District 15

CALIFORNIA STATE ASSEMBLY
District 23
District 24
District 28
Districts 18, 20, 21, 22, and 27
(uncontested)

PROPOSITIONS
Voters facing 20 ballot measures
Pro, con, for and against

LOCAL RACES
Santa Clara County
Board of Supervisors
Superior Court
Los Altos Hills Council
San Jose Council
Water District
Open Space Authority
Ballot measures

Alameda County
Board of Supervisors
Board of Education
Ballot measures

San Mateo County
Board of Supervisors
Half Moon Bay Council
Ballot measures

Santa Cruz County
Board of Supervisors
District Attorney
Superior Court
Ballot measures

San Benito County
Board of Supervisors
Superior Court
Board of Education

GRAPHICS
How to use Pollstar ballot machine

Are we there yet? An explanation of the primary process

NEWS
Politics & Government on Mercury Center

Campaign 2000 at RealCities

RESOURCES ONLINE
California Secretary of State voter information
California Voter Foundation's nonpartisan guide
League of Women Voters' nonpartisan guide
Rough and Tumble, a daily snapshot on California politics

Alameda County
Monterey County
San Benito County
Santa Clara County
Santa Cruz County

CREDITS

 
     

Posted at 11:00 a.m. PST Wednesday, February 16, 2000


LOS ALTOS HILLS CITY COUNCIL

What's at stake? Jim Steiner and Emily Cheng are running to replace veteran council member Bill Siegel, who is resigning because he is moving to San Francisco. This is a special election being held to fill the remainder of Siegel's term, which expires in November. At that time, three of the council's five seats will become vacant.

JIM STEINER

Who is he? Jim Steiner (www.jimsteiner.com), a Los Altos Hills resident since 1968, is a retired engineering manager for a major aerospace firm. Steiner, who earned a bachelor's at the University of Kentucky and advanced degrees at Purdue University, Columbia University and New York University, has served six years as chairman of the Los Altos Hills finance committee.Why is he running? Steiner says he will ensure that ordinances are enforced consistently. He wants to balance the property rights of owner-builders and existing neighbors, while preserving the right of architectural expression. Steiner said he will insist on strong fiscal planning and said he wants to assign a citizens committee to review and revise all planning and zoning ordinances to meet the town's needs.

EMILY CHENG

Who is she? Emily Cheng (www.emilycheng.com), 52, a 19-year resident of the town, is president of Imay Inc., an investment company. Cheng holds a bachelor's degree from UC-Berkeley, served on the town's planning commission from 1991 to 1999 and was its chairwoman in 1998-99.Why is she running? As a planning commissioner, she says she has a record of balancing neighborhood harmony by removing subjectivity from the planning process and administering ordinances consistently. If elected, Cheng said she will strive to make sure building fees are kept to a minimum and are commensurate with the town's costs. She'd also update the town's general plan to reflect citizens' viewpoints expressed in an upcoming town-wide survey.
   
       

Published February 20, 2000

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