The original version of this Voters Guide, published on the Mercury Center site, is no longer available. Some links will no longer function. Rotating banner ads appeared in this space.
     
 
 
 
   
Election 2000 logo (sm) Voters Guide Calif. Primary - Mar. 7

 

NATIONAL AND STATEWIDE
Open primary mixes parties
Smaller parties offer more choices
Presidential primary is a mother lode
The presidential candidates on the issues
Other candidates in the presidenital race
A quiet GOP Senate campaign
Other candidates for the Senate seat

U.S. HOUSE
District 10
District 12
District 13
District 14
District 15
District 16
District 17

CALIFORNIA STATE SENATE
District 11
District 13
District 15

CALIFORNIA STATE ASSEMBLY
District 23
District 24
District 28
Districts 18, 20, 21, 22, and 27
(uncontested)

PROPOSITIONS
Voters facing 20 ballot measures
Pro, con, for and against

LOCAL RACES
Santa Clara County
Board of Supervisors
Superior Court
Los Altos Hills Council
San Jose Council
Water District
Open Space Authority
Ballot measures

Alameda County
Board of Supervisors
Board of Education
Ballot measures

San Mateo County
Board of Supervisors
Half Moon Bay Council
Ballot measures

Santa Cruz County
Board of Supervisors
District Attorney
Superior Court
Ballot measures

San Benito County
Board of Supervisors
Superior Court
Board of Education

GRAPHICS
How to use Pollstar ballot machine

Are we there yet? An explanation of the primary process

NEWS
Politics & Government on Mercury Center

Campaign 2000 at RealCities

RESOURCES ONLINE
California Secretary of State voter information
California Voter Foundation's nonpartisan guide
League of Women Voters' nonpartisan guide
Rough and Tumble, a daily snapshot on California politics

Alameda County
Monterey County
San Benito County
Santa Clara County
Santa Cruz County

CREDITS

 
     

Posted at 1:55 p.m. PST Friday, February 18, 2000

THE PRIMARY

Smaller parties offer choices

A primer to state's newer political groups

Until 1998, "political parties'' for most voters meant Democrats and Republicans.

But now, eight parties are qualified in California and have candidates in many of the races on everyone's ballot. Voters should know the tenets of the six smaller parties.

  •  American Independent: On the ballot since 1968, this populist party initially was formed by former Alabama Gov. George Wallace during his presidential campaign. Today the party stands for local government with more control by voters with less taxation, spending and government regulation. Adherents believe in traditional moral values and want a strong defense and trade policy that puts Americans first.

  •  Libertarian: Founded in 1971, the party favors increasing individual liberties by limiting government activities. It combines liberal views on personal freedoms with conservative economic beliefs; wants many services provided by government to be supplied by private firms; opposes government aid to and regulation of businesses; favors a neutral foreign policy, including withdrawal from the United Nations and an end to any U.S. military role abroad.

  •  Green Party: Like a number of political parties worldwide, the party was founded in the 1980s. It qualified for the California ballot in 1992 -- by having at least 89,000 voters -- and promotes protecting the environment, democracy, fairness, non-violence, making government more local, equality, respect for diversity, responsibility, community-based economics and future focus.

  •  Peace and Freedom Party: It wants more democracy, cooperation and sharing to be achieved by organizing and educating people to work together to meet human needs; supports human rights, environmentalism plus social ownership and democratic management of industry and natural resources. The party has been on the ballot in California since 1968.

  •  Natural Law: Started in Iowa in April 1992, the party is an offshoot of the World Government of the Age of Enlightenment founded by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. Its first presidential candidate, John Hagelin, said then that the first step to solving the country's economic and social problems is for more people to practice Transcendental Meditation. The party advocates a preventive approach to health care, education and crime; a shift to renewable resources; cuts in defense spending; a 10 percent flat tax by 2001; and a return of power to state and local governments.

  •  Reform: The party held its national founding convention in Kansas City, Mo., in 1997. Started by Texas billionaire Ross Perot, the party advocates a balanced budget, term limits and political reform, especially in campaign financing.

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    Published February 20, 2000

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