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Election 2000 logo (sm) Voters Guide Calif. Primary - Mar. 7

 

NATIONAL AND STATEWIDE
Open primary mixes parties
Smaller parties offer more choices
Presidential primary is a mother lode
The presidential candidates on the issues
Other candidates in the presidenital race
A quiet GOP Senate campaign
Other candidates for the Senate seat

U.S. HOUSE
District 10
District 12
District 13
District 14
District 15
District 16
District 17

CALIFORNIA STATE SENATE
District 11
District 13
District 15

CALIFORNIA STATE ASSEMBLY
District 23
District 24
District 28
Districts 18, 20, 21, 22, and 27
(uncontested)

PROPOSITIONS
Voters facing 20 ballot measures
Pro, con, for and against

LOCAL RACES
Santa Clara County
Board of Supervisors
Superior Court
Los Altos Hills Council
San Jose Council
Water District
Open Space Authority
Ballot measures

Alameda County
Board of Supervisors
Board of Education
Ballot measures

San Mateo County
Board of Supervisors
Half Moon Bay Council
Ballot measures

Santa Cruz County
Board of Supervisors
District Attorney
Superior Court
Ballot measures

San Benito County
Board of Supervisors
Superior Court
Board of Education

GRAPHICS
How to use Pollstar ballot machine

Are we there yet? An explanation of the primary process

NEWS
Politics & Government on Mercury Center

Campaign 2000 at RealCities

RESOURCES ONLINE
California Secretary of State voter information
California Voter Foundation's nonpartisan guide
League of Women Voters' nonpartisan guide
Rough and Tumble, a daily snapshot on California politics

Alameda County
Monterey County
San Benito County
Santa Clara County
Santa Cruz County

CREDITS

 
     

Posted at 12:10 p.m. PST Wednesday, February 16, 2000

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 14

Three seek Republican nomination

They all focus on education; Eshoo, two others unchallenged

Three Republican candidates are seeking nomination in the primary race, including two who have run for office before.

Democratic incumbent Rep. Anna Eshoo will run unchallenged, as will a Natural Law candidate and a Libertarian.

The Republican candidate, Henry E. ``Bud'' Manzler, 60, a Cupertino resident who owns a San Jose-based printing business, lost in his run in the 1998 primary. Manzler says education is the top issue. He supports a voucher system for private schools. This, Manzler says, would increase the educational standards of public schools, which would have to compete with private and charter schools for students.

Bill Quraishi, 63, of Half Moon Bay is a consultant in nuclear and electrical engineering. He has run for Congress on numerous occasions and received the Republican nomination three times in the 1980s. Quraishi said children in public schools should receive $1,500 vouchers annually for private schools or private tutoring. He favors health coverage through tax-free medical savings accounts.

The third Republican candidate, Belmont-based Craig L. DeLue, 38, a marketing director for an insurance company, has never run for public office. He said education and taxation are key issues, and he supports allowing parents to choose their children's public school. DeLue describes himself as a conservative on fiscal issues. He supports two-year compulsory service in the armed services when people turn 18 years old.

Eshoo was first elected in 1992. She serves on the Commerce Committee, the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment and the Subcommittee on Telecommunication, Trade and Consumer Protection. She was co-author of the Patients' Bill of Rights and has obtained federal funding to purchase Bay Area lands for recreation and wildlife refuges.

John Black, 55, a Natural Law party candidate, has unsuccessfully sought federal office twice. Black teaches Transcendental Meditation in Palo Alto. He said the Natural Law Party looks at issues proactively by examining the root cause of the problem and then devising the solution.

Libertarian candidate Joseph W. Dehn III, 45, a Palo Alto resident and computer programmer, has run for Congress twice but has never received more than 1.7 percent of the vote. Dehn advocates cutting federal spending and eliminating income taxes, ending the war on drugs and deregulating the economy.


-- Mercury News Staff Writer Carole Rafferty

   
       

Published February 20, 2000

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